Sign up for updates
Big trends in timber design E-mail
Tuesday, 15 March 2011 00:00
From our archives: 2004 Australian Timber Design Award - Dawson Brown Architecture - Bungan Beach House
From our archives: 2004 Australian Timber Design Award - Dawson Brown Architecture - Bungan Beach House
Over the past twelve years, the Australian Timber Design Awards has witnessed a sea change in timber design. If you're thinking of entering the Awards, it's worth being aware of the five biggest trends making up this change:

  1. Sustainability. Public demand for low carbon footprint buildings has seen unprecedented innovation in Australian timber design. Projects such as Melbourne's Grocon building are the way of the future, achieving carbon neutrality through a rich spectrum of timber products.

  2. Complex design. Architects are increasingly using timber in technically complex designs. See, for instance, this innovative use of paper-backed veneer from 2010.

  3. Engineered wood products innovation. Designers are recognising the structural and aesthetic qualities of a new generation of engineered wood products -- products that allow rapid construction of sturdy timber-based buildings. Projects such as The National Portrait Gallery, from 2009, indicate the potential of these innovations.

  4. Building taller. Waugh Thistleton's acclaimed nine storey Stadhaus exemplifies the use of structural timber in mid-rise buildings. This recent trend is also evidenced by the growing popularity of two or three storey commercial and multi-residential timber framed buildings.

  5. Broader palettes. Entries into the Awards have featured increasingly varied timber palettes. Designers now favour native Australian timber species and naturally coloured -- rather than dyed -- veneers and panels.

Think you've got what it takes to be a timber design trendsetter? See our expanded range of entry categories and fill out an Awards registration form today.
 
Copyright © 2012 Timber Development Association