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Frank Tate Pavilion

The durability and warmth of timber is vital to encouraging many different inhabitants of the pavilion during the course of each day. The durability and warmth of timber is vital to encouraging many different inhabitants of the pavilion during the course of each day. Dianna Snape Photography

Cox Architecture

Victoria Entries 2010

The pavilion is an integral element for the university’s new learning precinct. Key to this precinct is the provision of quality built environments to support the institution’s new approach to student learning. Subsequently, the pavilion provides for a range of settings that promote individual and collaborative learning approaches, creating an environment that encourages participation and an extension of students’ time on campus.

Timber has been crucial to the success of the pavilion, allowing the treatment of the precinct’s new interior spaces to be replicated in the external environment. The architecture of the project honours timber in its association with domestic applications, allowing a warmth and familiarity to be brought to the education environment. The timber elements contribute to a range of crafted, textured and intimate spaces that are structured to encourage students and staff to inhabit the pavilion for a variety of uses, including group learning and social interaction.

As a functional sculptural piece, the timber contrasts with the steel and zinc to provide connected and intimate spaces which reflect ideas about public space as well as informal learning environments. Timber elements include decking, joinery, seats, screens, and ceiling and wall lining to provide a space which appears to unfold and envelope all at once.

The various timber species used throughout the project have been selected for and utilised in a range of applications where function and aesthetic are priority. Subsequently the durability and warmth of timber is vital to encouraging many different inhabitants of the pavilion during the course of each day. As such, Spotted Gum has been predominantly used due to its strength and durability, and attractive and varied colour and grain for the decking and lining boards. Other timber species used include recycled Blackbutt for the seating and Western Red Cedar for the batten screens.
Entered into:
  • Outdoor Timber – Stand alone structures (Sheds, landscapes, decks, etc), 2010
  • Best Use Of Solid Timber Cladding, 2010
  • Best Use Of Recycled Timber, 2010
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